Monday, September 28th was World Rabies Day, so BCAS would like to provide you with some important facts about rabies, as well as tips for preventing the spread of this disease.

The first step in prevention would mean ensuring that all of your pets, including indoor pets, are current on their rabies vaccination. This will significantly decrease the risk of exposure for both you and your furry loved ones.

The second most effective form of prevention is to avoid handling wildlife, especially any animals that may appear sick or injured. According to the CDC, the most common carriers of rabies in the United States are bats, skunks, raccoons and foxes. While assisting sick or injured wildlife is often done with the best of intentions, keep in mind that rabies can be easily transmitted through animal bites or if any of the infected animal’s saliva comes in contact with your eyes, nose, mouth or any broken skin.

For this reason, it is strongly recommended that if you come across any wildlife that you believe is in danger or needs medical assistance, please contact your local Animal Control facility immediately so that a trained professional may be dispatched to recover the animal. If you have been bitten by a wild animal, it is important to seek medical attention immediately.

There is no known cure for rabies and the mortality rate for the disease once symptoms have manifested is 100%. Countries across the world are working together to increase rabies awareness and prevention in order to reach a goal of zero rabies related human deaths by the year 2030. For more information on prevention tips, visit our website at www.baltimorecountymd.gov/.../animals.../rabies.html.

To update your pets on their rabies vaccines, be sure to schedule an appointment for one of our upcoming Rabies Clinics, which are held every Wednesday and Thursday between 9am – 4pm at our Baldwin facility. Help us reach “Zero by 30” by educating yourself and members of your community on effective ways to safeguard yourself and your pets from rabies.

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