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Avenuenews
editor's pick featured top story
From rescue to rescuer: the remarkable story of one very good boy
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ROSEDALE — A little over a year ago, he was abandoned in the street. Now, he puts his nose to work finding lost pets. Yes, Duck is a very good boy.

“He’s the most resilient creature I’ve ever met,” said John Roth, Duck’s owner, trainer and all-around dog dad. “He likes being around people, he likes being around dogs. I can only imagine what it must have done to his psyche to be out on his own alone.”

The Rescue

PHOTO COURTESY OF LEAH BIDDINGER 

“He was very scared and very skinny,” said Leah Biddinger, recalling her first encounter with Duck. “You could tell that he needed some loving.”

Sussex Community Association President Leah Biddinger estimates that Duck was left to fend for himself for at least a few weeks in the middle of winter. Local residents reported several sightings throughout Jan. 2020, but he always seemed to evade capture.

Then, on Jan. 27, Biddinger got a tip — one resident had him caught in their yard.

“I immediately rushed down there to grab him,” Biddinger said. “He was very scared and very skinny. You could tell that he needed some loving.”

Their first stop? McDonalds. He looked like he needed some chicken nuggets.

Next, she took Duck to a pet hospital for a check-up and then to Baltimore County Animal Services in hopes of tracking down his former owner.

But Biddinger, a staunch animal advocate who happily, only half-jokingly admits she prefers animals over people, couldn’t stand to just surrender him to the system. She left her name to claim him after the shelter’s stray hold, and began seeking a family who could foster him.

“I knew he needed somewhere that would be safe,” Biddinger said.

The Death Sentence

While it broke Biddinger’s heart to leave Duck at the shelter, she was about to receive some more heartbreaking news — they had tracked down his previous owner, who refused to take him back, saying he had a history of aggression and biting.

If no one offered to take on responsibility for Duck, those claims could have sealed the deal on a quick euthanasia.

But Biddinger wasn’t about to let that happen.

“He has one of the gentlest, nicest, most even-keel personalities,” she said. “When I went to pick him up, he was scared. I mean, he was petrified. I just reached right down, picked him up and put him in my car — not a growl, not a bark, not anything from him.”

AVENUE NEWS PHOTO BY JACOB TOOK 

John Roth, along with his wife Jen and daughter Eve, at first agreed to take Duck in temporarily. Of course, Leah Biddinger suspected they would fall in love with him.

She had found a family willing to take him — Roth, his wife Jen and daughter Eve had lost their dog Holly about a year and a half earlier. They had a whole lot of love to give, and after Biddinger reached out, they agreed to foster Duck temporarily.

Biddinger picked him up from the shelter and delivered him to the Roths in Rosedale on Feb. 3. Even then, she hoped that ‘temporary’ would stretch into something more permanent.

“He was beaten down,” Roth said. “You could tell he’d been on his own for a good long time.”

Duck was overwhelmed at first, and it took about three days for him to open up. Never at any point did Roth flag any aggressive behavior, and he doesn’t believe Duck would ever try to bite anyone.

“He mellowed out quickly,” Roth said. “He’s got a real soft temperament.”

Eve took to him immediately. Jen, however, was a harder sell, insisting that they weren’t ready for another dog.

AVENUE NEWS PHOTO BY JACOB TOOK 

John Roth worried Duck would not be suited for scent tracking, but was assured that any dog with the right temperament — and nose — could be up for the job.

The Training

On John’s birthday a few weeks later, Biddinger received a text from Jen. Her heart dropped, and she feared the worst — that they were sick of Duck and hoping to get him out from under their feet in a different, more permanent home.

“I read the rest of the text message and immediately just burst into tears,” Biddinger said. “They had decided to keep him, and from then on he’s gone from rags to riches.”

Biddinger and Roth first met through the Lost Animal Resource Group, a Baltimore-based network of missing pet recovery volunteers from whom Roth sought help after Holly went missing. Roth was also connected with Carmen Brothers, who runs the site Professional Pet Trackers with two highly trained tracking dogs of her own, and had an interest in putting Duck to use helping recover other lost animals.

Roth hoped Duck might be suited for tracking work, but worried that lacked the proper training. Carmen assured him that any dog with the right temperament — and nose — could be up for the job.

So Roth signed him up for an online class with the Missing Animal Response Network, where he would guide Duck through training exercises to sharpen his senses (and his ability to follow instructions).

“All dogs want to use their nose — it’s a natural thing,” Roth said. “It was just refining it, getting things on cue, letting him know when it was time to work and getting him to focus on following a single scent for long periods.”

AVENUE NEWS PHOTO BY JACOB TOOK 

At a training exercise at Cox’s Point Park, John Roth gives Duck a scent item which will lead him to Schatzi and owner Leah Biddinger, hiding somewhere nearby.

Biddinger helped, along with her own rescue Schatzi. They would get Schatzi’s scent all over a ‘scent item’ and give it to Duck before high-tailing it down the block, hiding in ever more challenging spots. Duck would lock in on the scent and follow the trail until he found them.

And he had a real knack for it.

Roth knew he would benefit from more intensive training, so he signed Duck up for a nearly two-month course from pro trainer Kimberly Thompson of Lone Star K9 Pet Trackers in Dallas, Tx. He already had the basics down, but Roth wanted to get him comfortable in different environments and with different distractions.

“There’s not much that throws him off anymore,” Roth said. “He’s got to be prepared to deal with anything, from seeing a cow to seeing a tractor trailer.”

Yes, they missed him during his weeks away, but they put their loving home to good use — Biddinger found another rescue for them to temporarily foster.

The Rescue Hero

Duck returned before Thanksgiving ready to hit the ground running.

AVENUE NEWS PHOTO BY JACOB TOOK 

“There’s a lot of potential here, and it’s just a matter of figuring out things to do with it,” John Roth said. “But for right now, missing pet recovery is exactly what I want to be doing.”

On a call down in Takoma Park, they were called in to help find a cat who had been missing for a few days. Duck tracked the scent from a tree where the cat had last been seen to a neighbor’s house, and eventually they discovered the cat camped out in the basement rafters.

Recently, they headed out to Perry Hall, where a cat had been missing since mid-December. Carmen had taken her two trackers out to find the cat a few weeks prior, but they eventually called off the search. Still, it was a good chance to see how Duck fared with an older scent.

“He locked onto the exact same trail as the two dogs three weeks prior,” Roth said.

They eventually narrowed the search down to a nearby commercial greenhouse where they still suspect the cat may be trapped.

They’re not part of any formal organization, Roth explained. He gets calls on social media, or from folks like Biddinger, and takes Duck out in a good-faith, volunteer effort to help people find their missing pets. He said they’d take on — or at least consider — any search and recovery mission in the eastern United States.

Roth doesn’t know what the future has in store for Duck, but he knows the pup has something special.

“There’s a lot of potential here, and it’s just a matter of figuring out things to do with it,” Roth said. “But for right now, missing pet recovery is exactly what I want to be doing.”

Biddinger encouraged folks with lost pets to reach out for help as soon as possible, and to have a scent item handy — ideally an old shirt or towel smothered with the one animal’s scent (doubly important for multi-animal households). Who knows — maybe it’ll be Duck on your doorstep to help find your missing pooch.

Looking back on how Duck’s story started, Biddinger said that seeing him thrive is its own reward.

“To find a dog that was thrown out like trash, and to have him just come full circle and give back, potentially helping other dogs get back home — it’s just the most amazing feeling in the world,” Biddinger said.

AVENUE NEWS PHOTO BY JACOB TOOK 

Success! Duck tracked Schatzi's scent through Cox's Point Park to find where she and owner Leah Biddinger hid in some trees. “To find a dog that was thrown out like trash, and to have him just come full circle and give back... it’s just the most amazing feeling in the world,” Biddinger said.

When Roth thinks back to the scared little pup cowering under his dining room table when Biddinger first dropped him off, it’s hard to believe how far he’s come.

“In the last year, seeing the turnaround in him has just been astonishing,” Roth said. “I couldn’t be more proud of this guy.”

Please email editor@avenuenews.com or call 443-239-0737 with questions, comments or story tips.


Avenuenews
School board rejects motion to allow teachers with COVID comorbidities to telework

The Baltimore County School Board considered a motion last week that would allow school staff with conditions that put them at high-risk for complications from COVID-19 to continue teaching by remote learning when schools reopen on a hybrid basis next month.

The motion failed by a vote of 9-3.

The motion was introduced by board member Lily Rowe (District 6), who stated in her first version “school system staff who apply for ADA accommodation based on any documented COVID comorbidity, be permitted to telework and/or teach virtually if their work duties can be completed by this accommodation.”

“It’s not clear to me,” Rowe said, “because COVID comorbidity is a fairly new thing and there is a risk of death to people who get COVID while having [the co-morbidities].

“And I don’t want teachers to be fired because they applied for an ADA accommodation and then they’re told they don’t have a disability.”

Rowe’s motion was supported by board member Lisa Mack (District 1), who said “we’ve been doing remote learning for almost a year now. It’s not an accommodation the school system has never put in place.”

“By virtue of us already being virtual, the accommodation has been accomplished.”

Russel Kuehn (an appointed member-at-large), expressed concern over merging the ADA – a disability issue – with a health issue and possible legal issues arising.

“Should we amend it to just talk about comorbidities and not mention disabilities?” he asked.

The legal counsel for the Board cautioned if the Board passed the motion, it could be creating a process that would run counter to the ADA’s individual determination process.

Rowe amended her motion to remove any reference to disabilities and the ADA: “I move the school system should request accommodations based on any documented comorbidity, and teachers be permitted to telework or teach virtually if their duties can still be done,”

A motion was made to postpone action on Rowe’s motion until it could be vetted more thoroughly. After much more discussion of legalities, Rowe amended her motion to “I move the superintendent allow school system staff to continue to telework or teach vcirtually if their work duties can be performed by telework or teaching virtually, and they have a documented COVID comorbidity.”

Another concern raised was the impact on schools if teachers were allowed to telework or continue remote teaching, in regards to having to find other teachers to cover for them if they had been assigned to teach students wanting face-to-face teaching.

The motion to postpone action failed 5-4, with two members missing the vote; Rowe’s amendment of her motion failed when only six voted in favor; and the original motion failed by a vote of three in favor, nine opposed.

Rowe, Mack and student member of the board Josh Muhumuza supported the motion; Kathleen Causey, Rod McMillion, Moalie Jose, Julie Henn, John Offerman, Cheryl Pasteur, Kuehn, Dr. Erin Hager and chairwoman Makeda Scott were opposed.

McMillion submitted a motion that the Board should resume in-person meetings on Feb. 23.

The motion was approved 11-1, with Rowe opposing it.


Avenuenews
editor's pick featured top story
Paranormal investigation series films episode at the Heritage Society

ESSEX — A shadowy figure at the end of the hall. Lights turning on and off. Mysterious handprints. An unmistakable and unshakeable scent of flowers. Tightness closing around the throat. The sharp spin of vertigo.

The reputation of the Heritage Society of Essex and Middle River is well known in paranormal circles — as an old building with a lot of history, as well as many historical artifacts, the museum is a haunting hotspot.

Enter Brandon Crotti, director and lead investigator on the PARAFlixx series Paranormal in The FunHouse, who visited the museum Saturday with a team of investigators to confirm — or debunk — the rumored activity for an episode of the show’s upcoming second season.

AVENUE NEWS PHOTOs BY JACOB TOOK 

“We chose this place because I’ve seen that it’s a hotspot for activity,” Crotti said. “What other people have captured here — I want to see if I can capture that, or maybe something better.”

Crotti has a background in gaming, but scored a contract with Facebook to support his ambitions for a show investigating all things paranormal. Just a few months after its debut, his show was nominated for best ghost hunting series at Higgypop’s 2020 Paranormal Entertainment Awards.

“When I started it, I didn’t think it was going to blow up,” Crotti said. “We’re out right now filming season two. We’re almost done, and already talking about season three.”

The show has seen some viral hits, capturing — purportedly — the voice of the goatman through a walkie talkie feed. It was during a visit to Havre de Grace’s Opera House, though, that the Heritage Society landed on Crotti’s radar.

AVENUE NEWS PHOTO BY JACOB TOOK 

Crotti asked to turn off the lights and even the boiler, preferring the cold to the possible sound interference.

“We chose this place because I’ve seen that it’s a hotspot for activity,” he said. “What other people have captured here — I want to see if I can capture that, or maybe something better.”

What started as a partnership with Facebook entertainment quickly gained momentum, and Paranormal in The FunHouse was picked up as an exclusive series on PARAFlixx, a streaming platform launching March 21 billed as Netflix for all things paranormal.

Saturday night was icy, with a chilly wind which wouldn’t seem to let up. It was dark when Crotti and his team arrived, unloading their equipment and taking stock of the building.

Inside, they were greeted by Cynthia ‘Sandy’ Gruzs, the museum’s Building & Maintenance Director as well as the coordinator of paranormal events. The museum has played host to several teams of investigators, each with their own distinct stories of hauntings and happenings, but this was the first time they’ve had a TV crew join the hunt.

Gruzs guided the crew around the museum, sharing some of her own striking and strange experiences, as well as the stories she has collected from other investigators through the years. The music room, the candle making studio, the veterans’ room, the classroom, the jail cells — each spot has its own hair-raising tale.

AVENUE NEWS PHOTO BY JACOB TOOK 

Crotti is a proponent of the stone tape theory, which suggests that the energy of emotional or traumatic events is recorded in rocks and other items.

Crotti is a proponent of the stone tape theory, which suggests that the energy of emotional or traumatic events is recorded in rocks and other items. He said that the history which has played out within the museum’s walls, as well as the historical artifacts collected inside, could contain traces of that energy.

“Let’s see if it lives up to the claims,” Crotti said. “I’m trying to see how much visual I can get.”

He asked Gruzs to turn off the lights and even the boiler, preferring the cold to the possible sound interference.

Then, Crotti and his team set to work, relying on an SLS KINNECT camera adapted from commonplace Xbox gaming equipment and other handheld devices to explore the darkened rooms and hallways.

AVENUE NEWS PHOTO BY JACOB TOOK 

The team used equipment like an SLS KINNECT camera and other devices to gauge the level of paranormal activity.

“If you were a firefighter, you should know the name of the building,” Crotti says in a teaser clip posted to Facebook. “Can you tell me where you worked?”

Listen closely — an eerily human but not quite intelligible voice answers.

“Woah, did you hear that?” Crotti says, looking at the camera. “What is that?”

You’ll have to check out Paranormal in The FunHouse to judge what they find for yourself. Or you could book a visit to the museum and come away with some chilling stories of your own. A true reporter prizes the truth, and the truth is, we may never know the reasons for and extent of the museum’s spiritual energy.

But we can keep hunting.

Please email editor@avenuenews.com or call 443-239-0737 with questions, comments or story tips.


African American Martineers at Sinclair Lane Gun Turret Assembly.

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